Prizes ! Prizes ! Prizes !

It’s been a busy couple of weeks for prizes for international and especially translated fiction ! Lots of good recent translations-into-English and international fiction to discover here (though predominantly European(-language) …) — though I encourage you to look beyond just the winners to the short- and long-lists, which also included loads of worthwhile titles.

Here the big winners of the biggest recent (English-language) prizes:

Man Booker International Prize shortlist

They’ve announced the shortlist for the Man Booker International Prize, the £50,000 prize for the best work of translated fiction published in the UK in the past year:

  • Compass by Mathias Énard, tr. Charlotte Mandell
  • Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin, tr. Megan McDowell
  • A Horse Walks Into a Bar by David Grossman, tr. Jessica Cohen
  • Judas by Amos Oz, tr. Nicholas de Lange
  • Mirror, Shoulder, Signal by Dorthe Nors, tr. Misha Hoekstra
  • The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen, tr. Don Bartlett and Don Shaw

The winner will be announced on 14 June.

Best Translated Book Award shortlist

They’ve announced the shortlists for the (American) Best Translated Book Award. The ten-title strong shortlist for fiction consists of:

  • Among Strange Victims by Daniel Saldaña Paris, translated from the Spanish by Christina MacSweeney (Mexico, Coffee House Press)
  • Chronicle of the Murdered House by Lúcio Cardoso, translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa and Robin Patterson (Brazil, Open Letter Books)
  • Doomi Golo by Boubacar Boris Diop, translated from the Wolof and French by Vera Wülfing-Leckie and El Hadji Moustapha Diop (Senegal, Michigan State University Press)
  • Eve Out of Her Ruins by Ananda Devi, translated from the French by Jeffrey Zuckerman (Mauritius, Deep Vellum)
  • Ladivine by Marie NDiaye, translated from the French by Jordan Stump (France, Knopf)
  • Oblivion by Sergi Lebedev, translated from the Russian by Antonina W. Bouis (Russia, New Vessel Press)
  • Umami by Laia Jufresa, translated from the Spanish by Sophie Hughes (Mexico, Oneworld)
  • War and Turpentine by Stefan Hertmans, translated from the Dutch by David McKay (Belgium, Pantheon)
  • Wicked Weeds by Pedro Cabiya, translated from the Spanish by Jessica Powell (Dominican Republic, Mandel Vilar Press)
  • Zama by Antonio di Benedetto, translated from the Spanish by Esther Allen (Argentina, New York Review Books)

(They also announced the five poetry finalists.)

And remember that it’s just two days until the Man Booker International Prize announces its shortlist!

Best Translated Book Award longlist

They’ve announced the longlists for the (American) Best Translated Book Award — 25 titles on the fiction one !

The titles are:

  • Among Strange Victims by Daniel Saldaña Paris, translated from the Spanish by Christina MacSweeney (Mexico, Coffee House Press)
  • Angel of Oblivion by Maja Haderlap, translated from the German by Tess Lewis (Austria, Archipelago Books)
  • Chronicle of the Murdered House by Lúcio Cardoso, translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa and Robin Patterson (Brazil, Open Letter Books)
  • Doomi Golo by Boubacar Boris Diop, translated from the Wolof and French by Vera Wülfing-Leckie and El Hadji Moustapha Diop (Senegal, Michigan State University Press)
  • Eve Out of Her Ruins by Ananda Devi, translated from the French by Jeffrey Zuckerman (Mauritius, Deep Vellum)
  • In the Café of Lost Youth by Patrick Modiano, translated from the French by Chris Clarke (France, New York Review Books)
  • Ladivine by Marie NDiaye, translated from the French by Jordan Stump (France, Knopf)
  • Last Wolf and Herman by Krasznahorkai László, translated from the Hungarian by George Szirtes and John Batki (Hungary, New Directions)
  • Memoirs of a Polar Bear by Tawada Yoko, translated from the German by Susan Bernofsky (Japan/Germany, New Directions)
  • Moonstone by Sjón, translated from the Icelandic by Victoria Cribb (Iceland, FSG)
  • Moshi Moshi by Yoshimoto Banana, translated from the Japanese by Asa Yoneda (Japan, Counterpoint Press)
  • My Marriage by Jakob Wassermann, translated from the German by Michael Hofmann (Germany, New York Review Books)
  • Night Prayers by Santiago Gamboa, translated from the Spanish by Howard Curtis (Colombia, Europa Editions)
  • Oblivion by Sergi Lebedev, translated from the Russian by Antonina W. Bouis (Russia, New Vessel Press)
  • On the Edge by Rafael Chirbes, translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa (Spain, New Directions)
  • The Queue by Basma Abdel Aziz, translated from the Arabic by Elisabeth Jaquette (Egypt, Melville House)
  • A Spare Life by Lidija Dimkovska, translated from the Macedonian by Christina Kramer (Macedonia, Two Lines Press)
  • Super Extra Grande by Yoss, translated from the Spanish by David Frye (Cuba, Restless Books)
  • Thus Bad Begins by Javier Marías, translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa (Spain, Knopf)
  • Umami by Laia Jufresa, translated from the Spanish by Sophie Hughes (Mexico, Oneworld)
  • Vampire in Love by Enrique Vila-Matas, translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa (Spain, New Directions)
  • War and Turpentine by Stefan Hertmans, translated from the Dutch by David McKay (Belgium, Pantheon)
  • Wicked Weeds by Pedro Cabiya, translated from the Spanish by Jessica Powell (Dominican Republic, Mandel Vilar Press)
  • The Young Bride by Alessandro Baricco, translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein (Italy, Europa Editions)
  • Zama by Antonio di Benedetto, translated from the Spanish by Esther Allen (Argentina, New York Review Books)

Continue reading

Saif Ghobash Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation

They’ve announced the winner of the 2016 Saif Ghobash Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation (Jonathan Wright for his translation of The Bamboo Stalk, by Saud Alsanousi), and while the prize is useful in pointing to what is judged to be a superior translation, what’s great about this prize is that they list all the titles that were considered — nineteen of them (of which two were poetry and the rest fiction); scroll down on the announcement page. This makes for a handy quick reference of recent translations-from-the-Arabic, with quite a few titles that may be of interest to you. Continue reading

Jan Michalski Prize for Literature

The Jan Michalski Prize for Literature is a CHF50,000 book prize that’s unusual for several reasons. First, it doesn’t differentiate between fiction and non-fiction. Second, it’s willing to consider any title, “irrespective of the language in which it is written”. (In reality, it is somewhat limited, with books generally having to at least be available in a French, German, or English translation, but that’s still much farther-ranging than the International Dublin Literary Award or the Man Booker International Prize, for example.

They’ve now announced this year’s winner: The Physics of Sorrow (by Georgi Gospodinov) — another fine choice (but you already knew that, since both author and book are mentioned in The Complete Review Guide to Contemporary World Fiction).

The other two finalists were also novels: The Way Things Were (by Aatish Taseer), and Što pepeo priča (by Dževad Karahasan; see the Suhrkamp foreign rights page).

International DUBLIN Literary Award longlist

The International DUBLIN Literary Award is among the more interesting English-language international book prizes. Books are nominated by participating libraries from many (though, alas, far from all) parts of the world — 109 cities in 40 countries for the 2017 prize, apparently — and these nominated titles make up the just-announced 147-title  longlist, from which a jury will now select a still-huge shortlist (to be announced 17 April 2017) and then a winning title (21 June 2017). Continue reading